OT: 6 December 1947 – Unsigned “The Royal Wedding March”



The Oban Times, 6 December, 1947

The Royal Wedding March

 In accordance with ancient Scottish custom, a bagpipe tune entitled “Her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth’s Wedding March” has been written to mark the occasion of the Princess’s recent wedding. She has been pleased to accept the tune which was presented in the form of a de-luxe M. S. bound in royal blue letter. The tune is a four-part March in two-four time with a fine swing and a lively air.

The author is Mr. John Grant who has by Royal Command of Their Majesties, received an invitation to a party at St. James Palace, to view the wedding gifts, which, in his own words “are really magnificent.”

This is the fourth Royal Wedding March which Mr. Grant has had the distinguished honour to compose.

Unknown: c. 20 November 1947 – Unsigned [Article about the Royal Wedding March]



Unknown, c. 21 November, 1947

Edinburgh, however, contributed at least one feature to mark the Royal Wedding–a bagpipe tune entitled “Her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth’s Wedding March.” It was composed by a 71-year-old piper, Mr. John Grant who lived in Groathill Avenue, Craigleith, and the manuscript was accepted by the Royal bride.

Looking back to the Edinburgh of November 20, 1947, the Royal Wedding was perhaps the only good memory of that day. That, and a comment in the news pages made by a granny who, with all her years of experience of weddings, said: “Aye, but there’ll be some washing-up for somebody when it’s a’ ower.”

ED: 21 May 1929 – Unsigned [Royal Piobaireachd]



The Evening Dispatch, 21 May, 1929

The Duke and Duchess of York have been pleased to accept an original Piobaireachd, entitled “Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of York’s Welcome to the Palace of Holyroodhouse.” The piobaireachd seeks to commemorate the Royal visit together with the important Union of the Churches of Scotland, thus reviving one of the most ancient of Scottish customs. The composer and designer is John Grant, F.S. A. (Scot.), an authority in piobaireachd, 27, Comely Bank Street, Edinburgh.

ED: 21 November 1947 – Unsigned [Article about Royal Wedding March]



The Dispatch, 21 November, 1947

In accordance with ancient Scottish custom for national events such as the Royal Wedding, a bagpipe tune has been composed entitled “her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth’s Wedding March.” The Princess has accepted the MSS. bound in Royal blue leather from the composer, Mr. John Grant of Groathill Avenue, Craigleith, who tells me that the tune is a “four-part march in two-four time with a fine swing and a lovely air.” This, incidentally, is the fourth Royal Wedding march Mr. Grant has composed.

EN: 20 November 1947 – Unsigned “Wedding March for Bagpipes”



The Edinburgh Evening News, 20 November, 1947

Wedding March for Bagpipes

 Princess Elizabeth has accepted the manuscript of a bagpipe tune composed by Mr. John Grant (71), 35 Groathill Avenue, Craigleith, Edinburgh, and entitled, “Her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth’s Wedding March.” This is the fourth Royal wedding March which Mr. Grant has composed.

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